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Wednesday, August 27, 2014

The Technocrats of Ferdinand Marcos: Manuel Alba, Part 2


The Technocrats of Ferdinand Marcos: Manuel Alba, Part 1





Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Developments in the Law of Territorial Acquisition, Law of the Sea and Energy Law: Their Relevance to the SCS Dispute (A Public Lecture by Melissa Loja, University of Hong Kong)





Developments in the Law of Territorial Acquisition, Law of the Sea and Energy Law:
Their Relevance to the SCS Dispute
(A Public Lecture by Melissa Loja, University of Hong Kong)
2 September 2014 (Tuesday) 2pm – 4pm
Third World Studies Center, Lower Ground Floor, Palma Hall,
University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City



Program

2:00 – 2:05            
Opening Remarks

2:05 – 2:10            
Introduction of the Speaker

2:10 – 3:10           
Lecture
Melissa Loja, PhD Candidate (Public International Law), University of Hong Kong

3:10 – 3:30            
Reaction

3:30 – 4:00            
Open Forum


About the lecturer
Melissa Loja is a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Law of the University of Hong Kong. Her field of research is public international law and her areas of interest are energy law, law of the sea and law of territorial acquisition.









Wednesday, August 20, 2014

New Third World Studies Center Deputy Director


The Third World Studies Center is pleased to announce its new deputy director, Prof. Jely A. Galang. Prof. Galang is an assistant professor of the Department of History, College of Social Sciences and Philosophy, University of the Philippines-Diliman. He has a master's degree in history from UP Diliman, and is currently pursuing doctoral studies in history in the same university. Prof. Galang's particular fields of interest include the Chinese in the Philippines and local and social history in 19th century Philippines and has done work on Ilocano migration. He is currently writing his PhD dissertation on Chinese migration in the Philippines from the 19th to the early years of the 20th century.

Please address official communications to Prof. Galang via the Center. Official e-mails may be sent to uptwsc@gmail.com.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

The 2014 UP TWSC Public Lecture Series on Natural Disasters Lecture 1-- Communicating Risks, Risking Miscommunication: Mass Media and the Science of Natural Disasters




The 2014 UP TWSC Public Lecture Series on Natural Disasters Lecture 1
Communicating Risks, Risking Miscommunication: Mass Media and the Science of Natural Disasters
Wednesday 3 September 2014, 9:30 – 11:30 am

Pulungang Claro M. Recto, Bulwagang Rizal (Faculty Center),
University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City


PROGRAM

9:30 – 9:35                    Opening Remarks

9: 35 – 9:40                   Introduction of the Lecturer and Reactors

9:40 – 10:20                  Lecturer
                                    Garry Jay Montemayor
                                    Chair, Department of Science Communication
                                    College of Development Communication
                                    University of the Philippines Los Baños

10:20 – 11:05                Reactors
                                    Nathaniel "Mang Tani" Cruz
GMA Resident Meteorologist and Former PAGASA Director

Shaira Panela
Freelance Science Journalist

Maria Luisa Bolinao
Professor, Department of History
College of Social Sciences and Philosophy
                                    University of the Philippines Diliman

11:05 – 11:30                Open Forum





Moderator
Jely Galang
Deputy Director, Third World Studies Center and
Assistant Professor, Department of History
College of Social Sciences and Philosophy
University of the Philippines Diliman
 

                                   
ABOUT THE LECTURE
When Typhoon Yolanda struck central Philippines, the public was steered in all directions in a tangle of terminologies. In the aftermath, government agencies had great difficulties defending their accurate forecasts over the lack of a clear explanation the public can understand. As a sign of admission, the Philippine  Atmospheric,  Geophysical  and  Astronomical  Services  Administration  (PAGASA),  the country’s weather agency, was quoted saying “more could have been done in explaining to the public the magnitude and gravity of a storm surge.” Malacañang was also quoted saying “perhaps [the government] could've communicated the danger better….“[we could've said] tsunami-like effect.” Be they warnings of a “storm surge” or a “tsunami,” the institutions the public turns to during natural disasters, it seemed, failed to reach out to an already wary and confused public. Accusations were hurled: If the people in Samar and Leyte have been warned against a tsunami, more lives would probably have been saved. The issue on semantics is not negligible, especially in times of natural disasters—when words in fact do save lives, as averred by one advocacy group on disaster risk management in the country. The surge in scale and occurrence of unprecedented risk from natural disasters points to the increasing importance of science communication, an emergent domain in the study and practice of development communication in the country. Science communication in the Philippines,  according  to  former  Dean  of  University  of  the  Philippines  Los  Baños  College  of Development  Communication  Dr.  Maria  Celeste  H.  Cadiz,  proceeds  from  the  communication  of scientific and technical information to a “cognizant…cultural process.” In describing the phenomena of natural disasters, science communication or the process of making science concepts popular and more comprehensible to various people through different media is gradually gaining currency and this is where the mass media comes to the fore as purveyor of eye-witness accounts. This is indicative of the Department of Science and Technology’s vision for science journalism in the country: “to popularize science through mass media and identify ways to bridge the communication gap between the scientists and the public.” The Center for Community Journalism and Development in the Philippines, however, reveals a still inchoate field of science communication in the country, particularly among the mass media: “low awareness and understanding of disaster risk and climate change concepts, plans, policies, programs and in some cases, even basic learning points such as definition of terms“are some of the factors that prevent the media from practicing an effective science communication of natural disasters. A quick Google search on the key words typhoon Yolanda would generate reports that mostly focus on casualties, destruction of properties, and foreign aid or donations. There are minimal reports on the science of the disaster and on why and how such disasters occur. How can we intimate an effective science communication of natural disasters in the country? What is the role of the mass media in the intrinsic relationship of science communication and natural disasters? How does the Philippine mass media situate itself as an active player in science communication as the country continues to be beset by natural disasters?

KEY QUESTIONS:
  1. What is science communication? What is the role of the mass media in the intrinsic relationship of science communication and natural disasters?
  2. How does the mass media situate itself as an active player in science communication and in reporting climate risks in particular? What is the current state of science journalism in the Philippines? Is there reluctance that science reporting will not sell to the public?
  3. How can we describe the relations and dynamics of science communication among scientists, journalists, and the public in the Philippines?
  4. How should “effective science communication” be conceptualized? Is it about increased public awareness of the issue? Or should it also aim for public engagement in disaster risk reduction and management? What ethical aspects should be considered by a science journalist?
  5. Is there such a thing as Filipino science communication or do we just adopt "international standards"? How do we factor in cultural context/specificities? What is the future of climate risk reporting in the Philippines?                    

See link for the concept paper of the public lecture series.