Google
 

Monday, October 27, 2014

The 2014 UP TWSC Public Lecture Series on Natural Disasters Lecture 3-- Improvising Normalcy, The Normalcy of Improvisations: Policy and Practice in Post-Disaster Governance


The 2014 UP TWSC Public Lecture Series on Natural Disasters
LECTURE 3

Improvising Normalcy, The Normalcy of Improvisations:
Policy and Practice in Post-Disaster Governance
7 November 2014 (Friday), 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
National College of Public Administration and Governance Auditorium
University of the Philippines
Diliman, Quezon City


PROGRAM

2:00 – 2:10  Opening Remarks
                    Maria Fe Mendoza, DPA
                    Dean
                    National College of Public Administration and Governance 
                    (NCPAG)
                    University of the Philippines Diliman

2:10 – 2:20  Introduction of the Lecturer and Reactors

2:20 – 3:00  Lecturer

                    Perlita Frago-Marasigan, PhD
                    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science
                    College of Social Sciences and Philosophy
                    University of the Philippines Diliman

3:00 – 3:30  Reactors

                    Kristoffer Berse, PhD
                    Assistant Professor
                    NCPAG
                    University of the Philippines Diliman

                    Val Barcinal, MD
                    Department Head
                    Marikina City Disaster Risk Reduction and 
                    Management Office
                    Marikina City

3:30 – 4:00  Open Forum

Moderators  
Maria Faina Diola, DPA
                    Assistant Professor and Director
                    Publications Office 
                    NCPAG
                    University of the Philippines Diliman

                    Jely Galang
                    Deputy Director, Third World Studies Center and
                    Assistant Professor, Department of History
                    College of Social Sciences and Philosophy
                    University of the Philippines Diliman


ABOUT THE LECTURE
If Republic Act No. 10121, the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act, is indicative of the role of the pure and applied sciences in Philippine legislation, then the intersection of the scientific and legal domains in the Philippines can best be described as tangential. In 2010, RA 10121 superseded Presidential Decree No. 1566 as the controlling law on disaster preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery in the Philippines. Among the new law's provisions are definitions of disaster, risk, and related terms, which had no antecedents in the previous law. Notably, most of these definitions are taken virtually wholesale from the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR), which is hinted at—as the said source is not explicitly acknowledged—by section 2c of RA 10121: “[It shall be the policy of the state to Incorporate] internationally accepted principles of disaster risk management in the creation and implementation of national, regional and local sustainable development and poverty reduction strategies, policies, plans and budgets.” Even the Act’s short title reflects the state’s apparent desire to adhere to the current international discourse on disasters and risk. However, it seems that the legislators behind RA 10121 hardly went beyond designing a law that features the apropos buzzwords and is line with other post-1987 legislation. The Local Government Code of 1991 set five percent of estimated revenues from regular sources to serve as a local government unit’s (LGU) calamity fund. RA 10121 hardly alters this by stating that the said percentage is an LGU’s minimum “disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM) fund” allocation. If the law is truly in line with UNISDR’s definitions of disaster-related concepts—which highlight community specificity and grounded assessments—why does it still mandate what appear to be merely arbitrary allocations for DRRM funds? Why does it fail to order LGUs to empirically determine the basis for disaster preparedness expenses? One can only wonder what the LGUs affected by the twin catastrophes of 2013 would have done had they been forced to base disaster-related expenditures on the studies of people who utilized more robust and reliable indicators for disaster preparedness than hearsay and watered-down memory. In view of increasing unprecedented risks from natural disasters, and possibly the requisite flexibility in disaster policy and governance, it is imperative to give thought to what LGUs will do moving forward—will they pay more heed to the recommendations of disaster scientists and scholars or will they trust that they will always get by on the kindness of local and foreign donors and the resiliency of Filipinos?


KEY QUESTIONS
1. In practice, have LGUs been utilizing the leeway given by the law to adjust their annual budget for disaster-related expenses? For example, since RA 10121 came into force, have typhoon-prone LGUs been allocating more than five percent of their estimated revenues from regular sources as DRRM funds?

2. Given that RA 10121 and related issuances do not specify how disaster preparedness expenses should be determined—at best providing non-exhaustive lists of what such expenses could be—what bases have LGUs used for deciding, for example, that seemingly interminable disaster readiness workshops should be prioritized over the construction of sturdy evacuation centers?


3. If grounded assessments for disaster preparedness purposes are not the norm, have LGUs relied more on improvisational means of dealing with the aftermath of disasters? How can this “new normal,” if at all, be described?

4. Is heavy reliance on a community’s “inherent” capacity to adapt and be resilient in the face of, say, the destruction wrought by a catastrophic typhoon a sustainable practice or can we outline a new form of reflexivity among frontliners in the government during natural disasters?

5. Moving forward, what can be done after the sunset review of the new law?



Click here for the concept paper of the lecture.










Friday, October 10, 2014

A Public Lecture by Dr. Benedict Anderson at the UP Asian Center


The Age of Globalization: Anarchists and the Anticolonial Imagination
Anarchists and the Anticolonial Imagination
A Public Lecture by Dr. Benedict Anderson
10 November 2014 (Monday), 2:30 - 5:00 PM
GT-Toyota Asian Cultural Center Auditorium
University of the Philippines-Diliman


Benedict Anderson's public lecture, "The Age of Globalization: Anarchists and the Anticolonial Imagination," is drawn from his own similarly titled book. The Age of Globalization’s focus (is) on the final decades of the nineteenth century. The near simultaneity of the last nationalist insurrection in the New World (Cuba, 1895) and the first in Asia (the Philippines, 1896) was no serendipity. Cubans and Filipinos did not merely read about each other, but had crucial personal connections and, coordinated their actions – the first time in world history that such transglobal coordination became possible. But the coordination was mediated through “representatives,” above all in Paris, and secondarily in Hong Kong, London and New York. Both Filipinos and Cubans found, to different degrees, their most reliable allies among French, Spanish, Italian, Belgian and British anarchists – each for their own, often non-nationalist reasons. The book attempts to map the gravitational force of anarchism between militant nationalism on opposite sides of the planet. Following the collapse of the First International, and Marx’s death in 1883, anarchism, in its characteristically variegated forms, was the dominant element in the self-consciously internationalist radical Left.

Anderson's lecture is in celebration of UP Asian Center's 59th anniversary. The UP Third World Studies Center, the UP Department of Political Science, and the UP Department of English and Comparative Literature are the co-sponsors to the event.

Serving as discussant is George Aseniero, a Rizal scholar and author of “From Cadiz to La Liga: The Spanish Context of Rizal’s Political Thought,” published in Asian Studies: Journal of Critical Perspectives on Asia (Vol 49:1 2013), where he examined the anarchist influences in Rizal’s political thought.



ABOUT THE LECTURER

Benedict Richard O’Gorman Anderson is Professor Emeritus of International Studies, Government and Asian Studies at Cornell University. He is best known for his Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism, which was first published in 1983 but has since undergone countless editions. It is a path-breaking and highly innovative work that has supplied one of the most popular and oft-quoted concepts in the academe and beyond. His other books include The Spectre of Comparisons (1998) and The Fate of Rural Hell: Asceticism and Desire in Buddhist Thailand (2012).



ABOUT THE DISCUSSANT


Dr. Aseniero was previously with the United Nations University (UNU), first in Geneva and then in Tokyo. He was in charge of the UNU research projects on development headed by Johan Galtung, regional studies for Latin America headed by Pablo Gonzalez Casanova, and the project on Africa headed by Samir Amin. As UNU researcher, he also worked with the Max Planck Institut in Germany in collaboration with Galtung. He obtained his Ph.D. in International Relations from the University of Geneva. He is currently an independent researcher/writer.

Seats are limited and are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Please contact Janus or Kat at 981-8500 local 3586 or email asiancenter@up.edu.ph for inquiries.

Friday, October 03, 2014

College of Arts and Letters General Education Lecture Series: TATAK UP


College of Arts and Letters General Education Lecture Series: TATAK UP
13 October 2014 (Monday), 1:00 - 4:00 PM
Claro M. Recto Hall, Bulwagang Rizal,
University of the Philippines-Diliman

Featured lecturers:

RICARDO T. JOSE, PhD
Department of History
College of Social Sciences and Philosophy

ELIZABETH VENTURA, PhD
Department of Psychology
College of Social Sciences and Philosophy


This lecture is organized by the College of Arts and Letters General Education Committee and co-sponsored by the College of Social Sciences and Philosophy and the Third World Studies Center. 

Wednesday, October 01, 2014

Bolivar and the Latin American and Caribbean Integration: Socioeconomic and Political Issues (A Public Lecture by Luis Britto Garcia)





Bolivar and the Latin American and Caribbean Integration: Socioeconomic and Political Issues
(A Public Lecture by Luis Britto Garcia)
Pulungang Claro M. Recto, Bulwagang Rizal (Faculty Center),
University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City
9 October 2014 Thursday 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm


PROGRAM

2:30 – 2:35                    
Welcome Remarks
Ricardo T. Jose
Director, Third World Studies Center and
Professor, Department of History,
College of Social Sciences and Philosophy, UP Diliman

2:35 – 2:40                    
Opening Remarks
Charge' d'affaires Yelitza Ventura
Embassy of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela

2:40 – 2:50                     
Solidarity Message from Philippines-Venezuela Solidarity Network

2:50 - 3:20                    

Lecture
Luis Britto Garcia
Professor, Central University of Venezuela

3:20 - 3:40                     
Discussion
Eduardo C. Tadem
Professor, Asian Center, UP Diliman

Maria Teresa R. Melgar
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
College of Social Sciences and Philosophy, UP Diliman

3:40 – 3:55                     
Open Forum

3:55 – 4:00                     
Closing Remarks
Jorge V. Tigno
Chair and Associate Professor
Department of Political Science
College of Social Sciences and Philosophy, UP Diliman

MODERATOR
Dennis Mendiola
Phil-Ven-Sol




ABOUT THE LECTURER

Luis Britto Garcia graduated as a lawyer at the Central University of Venezuela in 1962. He obtained a doctorate in law at the University in 1969 and a Diploma in Advanced Studies on Latin America, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris in 1982. He is a Professor of the Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences at the Central University of Venezuela since 1988. He was conferred the National Prize for Literature of Venezuela in 2001 and in 2010 awarded the Alba Cultural Award in Letters. In 2011, he was awarded the Prize of Anibal Aquiles Nazoa for Journalism. He is a narrator, essayist, playwright, artist, and author of 65 titles.